• Tezeta Band featuring Genet Abate and DJ Derek Smith

    The Jack London Revue, 529 SW 4th Ave, Portland, OR 97204, USA

    Tezeta Band is an eight piece ensemble that plays nostalgic Ethiopian soul music and has been playing old-school African jams across clubs and festivals to popular acclaim since 2008. Tezeta Band will be welcoming special guest vocalist Genet Abate at Portland Jazz hot spot the Jack London Revue.

    Genet Abate is originally from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Her passionate and alluring voice is a celebration of popular Ethiopian music.She currently lives in Minnesota and performs on stages throughout the United States.

    KMHD Morning Show DJ Derek Smith will begin the evening, spinning rare grooves and beats from his vast collection of fine vinyl. 

    Note:
    Ticket buyers receive free admission to the Jack London Burly-Q Revue, downtown's hottest cabaret show after the concert!


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  • Brown Branch Presents: Duke Ellington's Nutcracker Suite

    Portland Center Stage, 128 NW 11th Ave, Portland, OR 97209, USA

    Celebrate the holiday season with a big band musical tribute to Duke Ellington's Nutcracker Suite, led by Brown Branch (Domo Branch and Charlie Brown III). 

    Presented with a 15-piece jazz band featuring an all-star lineup of Portland musicians, including saxophonists Max Roark, Nicole McCabe, Mieke Bruggeman, Devin Phillips, Hailey Niswanger; trombonists Kyle Molitor, James Powers, Adriana Wagner; trumpeters Noah Simpson, Steve Montecucco, Farnell Newton, Justin Copeland; Domo Branch on drums; and Charlie Brown III on the piano. The concert will take place on the set of It's a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play on the U.S. Bank Main Stage.

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  • Ural Thomas & The Pain + Hillstomp-Two Night NYE Celebration!

    Doug Fir Lounge, 830 E Burnside St, Portland, OR 97214, USA

    URAL THOMAS & THE PAIN

    Universally recognized as one of the most exciting singers remaining from the original soul era, 82 year-old Ural Thomas and his band The Pain just released their third LP "Dancing Dimensions." Thomas initially made his name in the 1960s with stone cold soul classic releases like "Pain Is The Name of Your Game," "Can You Dig It," "Deep Soul," and his 1964 recording debut with The Monterays "Push - Em Up." After a musical journey that commenced in his native Portland, Oregon, and led to Los Angeles, Cincinnati, and New York, sharing stages with everyone from James Brown to Stevie Wonder to Otis Redding to Etta James, Thomas became disillusioned with the music business and returned home to the city of roses at the end of the decade - where he continues to reign as Portland's uncontested Soul Brother Number One. In 2014 Ural met drummer/bandleader Scott Magee at a Sunday jam session he'd been hosting for decades and Ural Thomas and The Pain was born. The full showband set to work, prolifically gigging, touring the world, and releasing four critically acclaimed records (two LPs and two singles) between 2015 and 2018. Despite the usual COVID-19 obstacles, The Pain finally completed their much-anticipated third album in 2021. While "Dancing Dimensions" explores everything from sweet Chicago soul to airy West Coast psychedelia to Sly funk, their latest collection retains the distinctive sound this well-oiled tightly-knit musical aggregation organically developed over years of relentless work. Classic yet unmistakably contemporary at the same time, "Dancing Dimensions" is the most accurate representation of The Pain's unique flavor, power, and musical breadth committed to vinyl thus far.

    HILLSTOMP

    Hillstomp sounds like a boom box blasting from a shopping cart. Two madmen have strapped an engine to the cart and it’s too big and running too hot. They've got a banjo and a megaphone, a washboard and a kick drum. They've stocked the cart with guitars, buckets, car parts, and microphones and they are hurtling towards a blown out bridge while the bad front wheel flaps manically. The fools think they can jump the bridge and land safely on the other side. They are very wrong but no one has told them because...well, they just seem so happy. And there you are, bouncing alongside them and deep down you hope they make it. Hillstomp is folk music in its purest form – from loud and gritty, to intricate and poignant, and most importantly, always heartfelt and true.


    Tickets available here.

  • Ural Thomas & The Pain + Hillstomp

    Doug Fir Lounge, 830 E Burnside St, Portland, OR 97214, USA

    URAL THOMAS & THE PAIN

    Universally recognized as one of the most exciting singers remaining from the original soul era, 82 year-old Ural Thomas and his band The Pain just released their third LP "Dancing Dimensions." Thomas initially made his name in the 1960s with stone cold soul classic releases like "Pain Is The Name of Your Game," "Can You Dig It," "Deep Soul," and his 1964 recording debut with The Monterays "Push - Em Up." After a musical journey that commenced in his native Portland, Oregon, and led to Los Angeles, Cincinnati, and New York, sharing stages with everyone from James Brown to Stevie Wonder to Otis Redding to Etta James, Thomas became disillusioned with the music business and returned home to the city of roses at the end of the decade - where he continues to reign as Portland's uncontested Soul Brother Number One. In 2014 Ural met drummer/bandleader Scott Magee at a Sunday jam session he'd been hosting for decades and Ural Thomas and The Pain was born. The full showband set to work, prolifically gigging, touring the world, and releasing four critically acclaimed records (two LPs and two singles) between 2015 and 2018. Despite the usual COVID-19 obstacles, The Pain finally completed their much-anticipated third album in 2021. While "Dancing Dimensions" explores everything from sweet Chicago soul to airy West Coast psychedelia to Sly funk, their latest collection retains the distinctive sound this well-oiled tightly-knit musical aggregation organically developed over years of relentless work. Classic yet unmistakably contemporary at the same time, "Dancing Dimensions" is the most accurate representation of The Pain's unique flavor, power, and musical breadth committed to vinyl thus far.

    HILLSTOMP

    Hillstomp sounds like a boom box blasting from a shopping cart. Two madmen have strapped an engine to the cart and it’s too big and running too hot. They've got a banjo and a megaphone, a washboard and a kick drum. They've stocked the cart with guitars, buckets, car parts, and microphones and they are hurtling towards a blown out bridge while the bad front wheel flaps manically. The fools think they can jump the bridge and land safely on the other side. They are very wrong but no one has told them because...well, they just seem so happy. And there you are, bouncing alongside them and deep down you hope they make it. Hillstomp is folk music in its purest form – from loud and gritty, to intricate and poignant, and most importantly, always heartfelt and true.



    Tickets avaiable here.

  • Black Tie/White Noise

    The Jack London Revue, 529 SW 4th Ave, Portland, OR 97204, USA

  • Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio

    The Get Down

    Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio—or as it is sometimes referred to, DLO3—specialize in the lost art of “feel good music.” The ingredients of this intoxicating cocktail include a big helping of the 1960s organ jazz stylings of Jimmy Smith and Baby Face Willette; a pinch of the snappy soul strut of Booker T. & The M.G.’s, The Meters, and sprinkles Motown, Stax Records, blues, and cosmic Jimi Hendrix-style guitar. It’s a soul-jazz concoction that goes straight to your heart and head makes your body break out in a sweat.

    The band features organist Delvon Lamarr, a self-taught virtuosic musician, with perfect pitch who taught himself jazz and has effortlessly been able to play a multitude of instruments. On guitar is the dynamo Jimmy James who eases through Steve Cropper-style chanking guitar, volcanic acid-rock freak-out lead playing, and slinky Grant Green style jazz. From Bellingham, Washington is drummer Julian McDonoough who has been in the scene since Delvon first laid his hand on the hammond organ. To say that Julian was destined for this trio is pure explosive chemistry that is sure to have you movin’ and groovin’.

    Founded by Larmarr’s wife and manager Amy Novo, the trio started from humble beginnings in 2015, but since then has released two Billboard charting albums and toured the world to sold out venues.


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  • BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA

    Patricia Reser Center for the Arts, 12625 SW Crescent St, Beaverton, OR 97005, USA

    The Blind Boys of Alabama have the rare distinction of being recognized around the world as both living legends and modern-day innovators. They are not just gospel singers borrowing from old traditions; the group helped to define those traditions in 20th century and almost single-handedly created a new gospel sound for the 21st. Since the original members first sang together as kids at the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind in the late 1930s (including Jimmy Carter, who leads the group today), the band has persevered through seven decades to become one of the most recognized and decorated roots music groups in the world.

    Touring throughout the South during the Jim Crow era of the 1940s and 1950s, the Blind Boys flourished thanks to their unique sound, which blended the close harmonies of early jubilee gospel with the more fervent improvisations of hard gospel. In the early 1960s, the band sang at benefits for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and were a part of the soundtrack to the Civil Rights movement. But as the years passed, gospel fans started to drift away and follow the many singers who had originated in the church but were now recording secular popular music. And the Blind Boys, who refused many offers to ‘cross over’ to secular music, also saw their audiences dwindle. However, the Blind Boys persevered and their time came again, starting in the 1980s with their starring role in the Obie Award-winning musical “The Gospel at Colonus,” which began a new chapter in their incredible history. It’s almost unbelievable that a group of blind, African-American singers, who started out touring during a time of whites-only bathrooms, restaurants and hotels, went on to win five Grammy® Awards, a Lifetime Achievement Grammy, be inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame, and to perform at the White House for three different presidents.

    Few would have expected them to still be going strong—stronger than ever, even—so many years after they first joined voices, but they’ve proved as productive and as musically ambitious in recent years as they did in the beginning. In 2001, they released Spirit of the Century on Peter Gabriel’s Real World label, mixing traditional church tunes with songs by Tom Waits and the Rolling Stones, and won the first of their Grammy Awards. The next year they backed Gabriel on his album Up and joined him on a world tour, although a bigger break may have come when David Simon chose their cover of Waits’ ‘Way Down in the Hole’ as the theme song for the first season of HBO’s acclaimed series The Wire. Subsequent Grammy-winning albums have found them working with the likes of Ben Harper, Robert Randolph, Aaron Neville, Mavis Staples, The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Allen Toussaint and Willie Nelson.

    In 2013 the band worked with Justin Vernon (of Bon Iver) to release I’ll Find A Way, a powerful collection of gospel and spiritual songs new and old, featuring some of the Blind Boys’ most fervent vocals as well as contributions by a new generation of Blind Boys fans, including Merrill Garbus of tUnE-yArDs, Patty Griffin, and Justin Vernon himself. In 2014 the Blind Boys released Talkin’ Christmas!, a collaboration with Taj Mahal, that continued the band’s streak of creating original and interesting work. It includes new versions of Christmas standards, covers of hidden gospel gems, and seven brand-new holiday songs featuring Money Mark on keyboards, Taj Mahal on vocals and songwriting collaborations with Stax Records soul legend William Bell.

    In 2017 the Blind Boys released Almost Home on the band’s own BBOA Records label, in collaboration with Amazon Music. The 12-song collection serves as a fitting capstone to a seven-decade career that has both defined the sound of the American South and pushed it forward from the 20th century and into the 21st. Almost Home was recorded over four different sessions with four different GRAMMY-winning producers in four different cities. John Leventhal recorded the Blind Boys and their band in New York City, Vance Powell in Nashville, Chris Goldsmith in Seattle, and Los Lobos’ Steve Berlin at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals. The album is composed primarily of original songs which focus on the remarkable journey of the band’s two surviving original members at the time, long-time leader Clarence Fountain (who has since passed away), and current leader Jimmy Carter. It features songwriting contributions from an exceptional collection of artists including Valerie June, North Mississippi Allstars, Phil Cook, John Leventhal, Marc Cohn, Ruthie Foster, and more. Almost Home succeeds in looking backwards, while still sounding as vital and modern as ever.

    2019 brought them back together with Marc Cohn and producer John Leventhal for Work To Do, a unique collection that combines the songwriting talents of Marc Cohn with the soul-stirring harmonies of the Blind Boys which falls on the heels of more than a year of live collaborative dates. Work To Do is comprised of three studio tracks by Cohn and the Blind Boys (two originals, including the title track, and a version of the gospel standard “Walk In Jerusalem”) plus seven intimate live performances recorded at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center in Old Saybrook, CT, during a taping of the PBS series The Kate. Original plans were to release an EP containing the studio tracks, but the excitement and magic captured during the taping inspired the decision to create this unique hybrid album.

    Since they released their debut single, “I Can See Everybody’s Mother But Mine,” on the iconic Veejay label in 1948, the Blind Boys have been hailed as “gospel titans” by Rolling Stone and have collaborated with everyone from Stevie Wonder to Prince and Lou Reed, and performed on some of the world’s most prestigious stages. The New York Times said that they “came to epitomize what is known as jubilee singing, a livelier breed of gospel music,” adding that “they made it zestier still by adding jazz and blues idioms and turning up the volume, creating a sound…like the rock ‘n’ roll that grew out of it.” The New Yorker simply called them “legendary.”

    The Blind Boys’ live shows are roof-raising musical events that appeal to audiences of all cultures, as evidenced by an international itinerary that has taken them to virtually every continent. The Blind Boys of Alabama have attained the highest levels of achievement in a career that spans over 75 years and shows no signs of diminishing.


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  • Soul'd Out Presents Days of Bowie: Black Tie/White Noise: Black Star

    The Jack London Revue, 529 SW 4th Ave, Portland, OR 97204, USA

    Join us for the third installment of Black Tie/White Noise, where The Christopher Brown Quartet will perform David Bowie’s seminal final studio album, Black Star, in its entirety. Recorded in secret while Bowie was battling liver cancer, this album is especially emotional and poignant, and producer Tony Visconti described it as Bowie's intended swan song and a parting gift for his fans before his death. Black Star was recorded with a group of New York based jazz musicians, combining art rock with different styles of jazz, which makes this the perfect album for The Christopher Brown Quartet to interpret and perform.

    While Black Star will comprise the first set, the second set will be a tour of David Bowie classics, which will include commercial hits and album tracks, along with a chance for audience participation.
    For more information on Days of Bowie, including other events, please visit daysofbowie.com

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  • ALLIANCE | PJCE WITH IAWM JAZZ COMPOSITION WINNERS

    Lincoln Recital Hall, Room 75, in the basement., 1620 SW Park Ave, Portland, OR 97201, USA

    Portland Jazz Composers Ensemble plays music by winners of the IAWM/PJCE Jazz Composition prize
    Featuring Migiwa Miyajima, Samantha Spear, Jhoely Garay, Yu Nishiyama and Eliana Fishbeyn.

     

    Since 2018, the International Association for Women in Music (IAWM) awards an annual Jazz Composition Prize co-sponsored by PJCE. Through this partnership, PJCE has been introduced to up-and-coming composers across the country. At 7:00 pm on Saturday, January 28, 2023 in Portland State University’s Lincoln Recital Hall, PJCE will perform music by all five of the winning composers: Jhoely Garay (NYC), Migiwa Miyahima (NYC), Yu Nishiyama (NYC), Sam Spear (Boston), and Eliana Fishbeyn, all lauded instrumentalists and band leaders in their own right.  Surrounding Alliance, PJCE will host a panel discussion and guest composers will work with area university students. 

  • Biamp Portland Jazz Festival: BILL FRISELL FOUR feat. Johnathan Blake, Gerald Clayton, Gregory Tardy

    12625 SW Crescent St, Beaverton, OR 97005, USA

    BillFrisell’s careeras a guitarist and composer has spanned more than 40 years and many celebratedrecordings, whose catalog has been cited by Downbeat as “the best recordedoutput of the decade”.

    Twoyears after issuing his acclaimed trio album Valentine, GRAMMYAward-winning guitarist and composer Bill Frisell returnswith Four, a stunning meditation on loss, renewal, and thosemysterious inventions of friendship. Frisell’s third album for Blue NoteRecords proffers new interpretations of previously recorded originals as wellas nine new tunes. The session brings together artists of independent spiritsand like minds: Blue Note stablemates Gerald Clayton on pianoand Johnathan Blake on drums, and longtime collaborator GregTardy on saxophone, clarinet, and bass clarinet.

    Four presents this sideof his artistry at its most intuitive.

    Aspectsof Four reflect Frisell’s affection for Americana, and skilledsaturation of blues. But what’s poised to give the record its staying is lesstangible. “The album is capturing this first moment in time when we were, allfour, together, playing these songs,” he says. “Music is incredible that waybecause we’ll never play these songs this way again. Once we start playing themlive, they’ll change.”


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